PAST EXHIBITIONS

William Kurelek's suite of paintings title Jewish Life in Canada was made to honour his friendship with the Toronto art dealer Avrom Isaacs.

Generations: The Sobey Family and Canadian Art will tell the story of one family’s visionary engagement with Canadian and Indigenous art.

While women artists of the early twentieth century are known for depicting interior spaces as places of privacy and domestic quietude, Margaux Williamson’s interiors reveal spaces of creativity, subjectivity, and a kind of anarchic experimentation.

This major exhibition of Canadian women artists coincides with, and offers commentary on, the centenary celebration of the Group of Seven.

Denyse Thomasos: Odyssey

June 14 - October 24

Denyse Thomasos (1964–2012) was a Trinidadian-Canadian artist whose epic paintings incorporate imagery from a range of sources, including Caribbean textiles, historic slave ships, industrial shipyards, graveyards, villages and maximum security prisons.

Early Days will gather remarkable artworks together, and the stories that go with them, in an eight-month celebration of these powerful legacies. The show will also include recent acquisitions reflecting the diversity and vitality of Indigenous art in Canada today.

Uprising: The Power of Mother Earth, co-produced by the Thunder Bay Art Gallery and Carleton University Art Gallery, is the first retrospective of Christi Belcourt’s work, and spans more than twenty-five years of her art-making career.

Brenda Draney

March 7 - October 25

Brenda Draney’s paintings, with their gestural mark-making and wide expanses of canvas, present fragmented narratives that stem from her personal history as a Cree woman, living in northern Alberta.

Hartman's portraits speak to the power of the imagination in experiencing – physically, emotionally and philosophically – the diverse landscapes of our country and the stories that they hold.

Walter J. Phillips: At the Lake

February 15 - October 12

This special presentation of works on paper by the Canadian painter and printmaker Walter J. Phillips (1884–1963) explores the artist’s emotional connection and artistic response to Ontario’s Lake of the Woods region.